Project Description

Living
Hoardings

Barangaroo Hoardings

Gadigal land

Key Facts

Year Completed:
2020
Garden Type:
Green Wall
Size of Garden:
64m2
Number of Plants:
2,740
Types of Species:
Convolvulus cneorum; Eremophila ‘Kalbari Carpet’; Strobilanthes anisophyllus; Westringia fruticose; Alternanthera dentata, Euonymous microphylla, Euryops pectinatus; Convolvulus maurtanicus; Correa ‘Alba’; Dipladenia sanceri ‘Red Riding Hood’; Plectranthus ciliates; Strobilanthes anisophyllus; Begonia viola/chloro; Begonia coccinea; Nephrolepis exaltata; Nematanthus glabra; Trachelospermum jasminoides; Chlorophytum Green; Chlorophytum Green Zantedeschia; Neomerica gracilis; Schefflera aboricola; Duranta ‘Geisha Girl’
Client:
Lendlease

In an ever-changing landscape, Barangaroo’s hoardings come down as new ones rise to begin the construction of another tower in the precinct. Often seen as a bland, utility structure, Lendlease use their hoardings as an opportunity to bring urban areas to life with nature.

Demonstrating their commitment to reducing construction waste to landfill, Lendlease relocated the Junglefy Green Hoardings from one construction site to another in Barangaroo’s Northern end. The Green Hoardings not only connect people to nature but they trap construction dust and help to cool the surrounding area by absorbing reflected heat from the road.

Our role

Making this project circular with the reuse of the Green Hoardings, Junglefy took the plant modules from the first site, back to our Nursery to be looked after until the new site was ready for the installation of the plants onto the hoardings. The thriving plants were transitioned to their new home and they are now regularly managed by our maintenance team to keep the plants in top health.

Key Innovation

The use of hoardings as living walls is a new opportunity to bring nature to our cities and hadn’t been done before Lendlease’s first hoarding project. Transforming hoardings with plants delivers benefits to people, biodiversity and creates more engaging spaces throughout our cities. As our cities evolve, we’ll continue to look for more opportunities to create connections to nature.